101st Airborne Division Army Soldiers Chant
Soldiers with Company D, 3rd Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, run in cadence during the four-mile Division run on Fort Campbell, Ky., Friday. The run kicks off the 2012 Week of the Eagle, which celebrates the 101st Airborne Division’s 70th anniversary, and runs Aug. 11 through Aug. 17. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Jennifer Andersson, 159th Combat Aviation Brigade Public Affairs/RELEASED) Photo courtesy of DVIDS

Why do soldiers chant or “call cadence” during marches and runs?  The catchy call and response songs are designed to build camaraderie, break the monotony of physical training and keep soldiers in step.

Why do soldiers chant or “call cadence” during marches and runs?  The catchy call and response songs are designed to build camaraderie, break the monotony of physical training and keep soldiers in step.

The songs also develop cardio-respiratory endurance by forcing troops to control their breath during strenuous activities, according to the Army.

They most likely have their roots in European martial drumbeats once used to guide the speed to which infantry units traveled.

Some of my earliest memories of cadence come from attending my Chemical Officer Basic Course at Ft McClellan, AL in 1985.  Back then the cadence were a little more colorful than they are now.

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